Diagnostic Imaging

Appointments may be made by calling 833.234.4050

Georgetown Community Hospital's diagnostic imaging services (Radiology) features technology to assist your physician in the accurate diagnosis of disease. We have exceptional care and technical expertise from our radiologic technologists to our radiologists. The hospital adheres to stringent standards set forth by the Joint Commission, the American College of Radiology, and the State of Kentucky. Our commitment to you is to bring you comfort with the highest quality of care in diagnostic imaging. We strive to provide quick, accurate, and dependable reports.

Imaging Services

  • 16-Slice & 64-slice computed tomography (CT) scans: These produce detailed images of the body, providing information about the internal organs, bones, and soft tissues and with computer generated assistance creates cross-sectional (“slices”) images of body tissues and organs that are used to diagnose diseases and disorders.

  • Bone density (DEXA):  A Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) test is a bone density study used to determine whether or not you have osteoporosis or low bone mass.

  • Digital mammography & 3D mammography : Is an X-ray of the breast that is the best method of early breast cancer detection. 3D mammography is more effective at detecting certain cancers in breast tissue that may be more dense.

  • Echocardiogram (ECHO): An ECHO uses sound waves to create a moving picture of your heart, and is much more detailed than a standard X-ray without any exposure to radiation. It is an ultrasound video used to diagnose various heart diseases by evaluating the heart’s size, strength of contraction, areas of muscle weakness, valve function, and the accumulation of fluid.

  • Interventional radiology (IR): Interventional radiology uses specialized imaging techniques to guide radiologists in performing catheter based therapeutic procedures. IR allows for minimally invasive treatment of nearly every organ system and combines multiple imaging modalities, such as x-ray, CT, ultrasound, and MRI.
    • Bone biopsy
    • Liver biopsy 
    • Lung biopsy 
    • Renal biopsy
    • Thyroid biopsy
    • Arthogram
    • Bone marrow
    • IVC filter
    • Lumbar puncture
    • Myelogram (cervical, thoracic and lumbar) 

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): The wide bore MRI uses magnetic fields and radio waves to obtain images of your body in greater detail, which helps differentiate between normal and abnormal tissue.  

  • Nuclear medicine: It uses radio-pharmaceuticals to diagnose a variety of diseases. Nuclear Medicine scans available include bone, gallbladder/liver, heart, lung, renal, and thyroid.

  • Positron emission tomography (PET) scan: This is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which  provides important information about many conditions affecting the heart, brain or other organs. PET images are different than those from conventional imaging, such as X-rays, CT, ultrasound, or MRI because they contain information about tissue function.

  • Stereotactic: A recent mammogram may show an abnormality or tiny calcium deposits, called micro calcifications, in your breast. Only a biopsy can determine if that abnormality is cancerous or benign (noncancerous). Stereotactic biopsy is a diagnostic tool. It is a nonsurgical way to obtain the tissue sample needed to make a conclusive diagnosis. Two digital X-ray images of breast tissue are taken at different angles. A computer uses the images to locate the abnormality and calculate precise coordinates. Then  the computer guides the physician in placing the needle at the  correct target area. A Stereotactic Breast Biopsy is the most accurate, efficient and minimally invasive biopsy technique today.

  • Ultrasound: These examinations are non-invasive and painless, and are performed with the use of a probe that emits sound waves, making an image from the reflection of the sound waves. Diagnostic ultrasound is performed for a wide variety of indications, including general, breast, vascular, and echo ultrasounds.

  • Vascular studies: Vascular exams are used to evaluate your arteries and veins. With Doppler ultrasound we can examine the anatomy

  • X-ray: An X-ray (or radiographic) image is produced by sending a small amount of radiation through the body. An X-ray can be used to image bones, as well as organs and other tissues within the body.​​​

Are you concerned about exposure to radiation? Look for the ACR gold seal and put your mind at ease. Georgetown Community Hospital is accreditated in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mammography and a designated lung cancer screening center from the American College of Radiology (ACR). The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. 

  

Accreditation Frequently Asked Questions

1. What should I know about radiation safety?

Before your imaging procedure be sure to ask your physician the following questions:

  • Why is the test needed?
  • How will having the test improve my care?
  • Are there alternatives that do not use radiation and deliver similar results?
  • Is the facility accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR)?
  • Are pediatric and adult tests delivered using the appropriate radiation doses?

2. Why should I have my imaging exam done at an accredited facility?
When you see the gold seals of accreditation prominently displayed in our imaging facility, you can be sure that you are in a facility that meets standards for imaging quality and safety. Look for the ACR Gold Seals of Accreditation.

To achieve the ACR Gold Standard of Accreditation, our facility's personnel qualifications, equipment requirements, quality assurance, and quality control procedures have gone through a rigorous review process and have met specific qualifications. It's important for patients to know that every aspect of the ACR accreditation process is overseen by board-certified, expert radiologists and medical physicists in advanced diagnostic imaging.

3. What does ACR accreditation mean?

  • Our facility has voluntarily gone through a vigorous review process to ensure that we meet nationally-accepted standards of care.
  • Our personnel are well qualified, through education and certification, to perform medical imaging, interpret your images, and administer your radiation therapy treatments.
  • Our equipment is appropriate for the test or treatment you will receive, and our facility meets or exceeds quality assurance and safety guidelines.

4. What does the gold seal mean?
When you see the ACR gold seal, you can rest assured that your prescribed imaging test will be done at a facility that has met the highest level of imaging quality and radiation safety. The facility and its personnel have gone through a comprehensive review to earn accreditation status by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the largest and oldest imaging accrediting body in the U.S. and a professional organization of 34,000 physicians.

Preparing for Your Exam

You will need your insurance card and co-pay. You may register in the front lobby of the hospital or in the emergency room. 

  • BARIUM ENEMA - weight limit 500 lbs - Pick up 3 bottles of mag citrate from the drug store. After you eat lunch, you can only have clear liquids for the rest of the day up until midnight. Drink the 1st bottle at 6 pm; wait 1 ½ hours to drink the 2nd bottle; and another 1 ½ for the 3rd. Nothing at all to eat OR drink after midnight.

  • CT/CTA SCAN - weight limit 650 lbs - For abdomen or pelvis scans (except kidney stone protocol), do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to your test. For any CT with IV contrast do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to your test. If you are over 60 years old or diabetic – BUN & Creatinine (lab work) within the last 30 days is required. If you are drinking contrast, please arrive 1 ½ hours before your appointment time. This allows ample time to register and drink the oral contrast for the study. NPO 6 hours

  • ECHO- weight limit 500 lbs - Regular Transthoracic Echo has no prep. Stress Echo – no caffeine or decaf products 24 hours prior to test; no beta blockers 24 hours prior to test; do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to test. Transesophogeal Echo (TEE) – do not eat or drink anything 8 hours prior to your test, but DO take all your medications.

  • EEG (completed in Respiratory Therapy department) - Wash your hair thoroughly. Do not use conditioners, gel, hair spray, mousse, etc. If your order says you are to be sleep deprived, you must have less than 4 hours sleep in the 24 hours prior to your test. Please avoid caffeine the night before your test. You may eat and take your medications as normal.

  • IVP - weight limit 500 lbs - Pick up 3 bottles of mag citrate from the drug store; after you eat lunch, you can ONLY have clear liquids the rest of the day until midnight; drink the 1st bottle at 6pm, wait 1 ½ hours to drink the 2nd bottle, and another 1 ½ hours to drink the 3rd bottle. Nothing at all to eat OR drink after midnight. If you are over 60 years old or diabetic – BUN & Creatinine (lab work) within the last 30 days is required.

  • MAMMOGRAPHY - Do not wear lotion, powder or deodorant.  If you have previous mammograms at another facility, please bring these with you to avoid a delay in your results.

  •  NUCLEAR MEDICINE STUDY - weight limit 440 lbs

    • Stress Test – no caffeine or decaf products 24 hours prior to test; no beta blockers 24 hours prior to test; do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to test.  No Cardiazem, Diltiazem, or Verapamil (calcium channel blockers). See additional instructions on the back.  ***Please bring a list of your medications***

      • GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR MEDICINE STRESS TEST

      1. Nothing to eat or drink at least 6 hours prior to test.

      2. No smoking 6-8 hours prior to test.

      3. If you are diabetic and using insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications, ask your doctor for special instructions prior to test.

      4. Tell your doctor if you have a history of wheezing, asthma, or chronic lung disease.

      5. Do not apply any creams, lotions, or powders to your body on the day of the test.

      6. Wear comfortable shoes and clothes for brisk exercise the day of the test.

      7. Do not consume any foods containing caffeine for 24 hours prior to the test. This includes items listed as caffeine free or decaffeinated. Examples include: chocolate, chocolate chip cookies, chocolate cake, chocolate pudding, brownies, diet supplements, energy bars, energy drinks, products containing Guarana.

      8. Do not consume any drinks containing caffeine for 24 hours prior to the test. This includes items listed as caffeine free or decaffeinated. Examples include: cocoa, tea, coffee, soft drinks, energy drinks, chocolate milk.

      9. Do not consume medications containing caffeine for 24 hours prior to test. Examples include: Cafcit, Caffedrine, Enerjets, Excedrin, Keep Alert, No Doz, Overtime, Stay Awake, Vivarin, Anacin, Cafatine-PB, Cafergot, Ercap, Esgic, Esgic Plus, Fioricet, Fiorinal, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Synalgos DC, Wigraine.

      10. Avoid drugs containing Theophylline for 24 hours prior to the test. Examples include: Aerolate, Aminophylline, Bronkodyl, Constant T, Elixophylline, Primatene, Quibron, Respbid, Slo-Bid, Slo-Phyllin, T-Phyl, Theobid, Theobal SA, Theo 24, Theolair, Theoclear, Theodrine, Theodur, Theospan, Theovent, Theo-Organidin, Theo-Sav, Theo-X.

      11. Avoid drugs containing Dipyridamole for 24 hours prior to the test. Examples include: Aggrenox, Apo-Dipyridamole, Dipridacot, Persantine.

      12. Avoid all Beta Blockers 24 hours prior to the test. Examples include:

        Aceubutolol (monitan, rhotral, sectral)

        Amiodarone (cordarone, pacerone)

        Atenolol (apo-atenolol, gen-atenolol, novo-atenolol, tenolin, tenormin)

        Betaxolol (kerlone)

        Bisoprolol (zebeta)

        Carteolol (cartroli, ocupress)

        Carvedilol (coreg)

        Esmolol (brevibloc)

        Guanadrel (hylorel)

        Guanethidine (ismelin)

        Labetolol (normodyne, trandate)

        Metoprolol (apo-metroprolol, betaloc, lopressor, novo-metoprolol, nu-metop, toprol, toprol xl)

        Nadolol (alti-nadolol, apo-nadolol, corgard, novo-nadolol)

        Penbutolol (levatol)

        Pindolol (apo-pindol, novo-pindol, nu-pindol, visken)

        Propranolol (apo-proproanolol, inderal, inderal la, novopranol, pms-propranolol)

        Sotalol (apo-sotalol, betapace, betapce af, novo-sotalol, rylosol, sotacor)

        Timolol (apo-timol, betimol, blocadren, novo-timol, timoptic, timoptic xe)

      13. Please bring a list of your current medications and/or the medication bottles.

    • HIDA Scan – do not eat or drink anything 8 hours prior to test, including gum, candy, medications, and smoking. If you are allergic to milk/soy, please let scheduler know.

    • Gastric Emptying Study – do not eat or drink anything 8 hours prior to test, including gum, candy, medications, and smoking.

    • Parathyroid/Sestamibi – PTH and Calcium (lab work) is required.

    • I123 Thyroid Uptake – do not take thyroid medications 4 weeks prior to your test; do not have IV contrast 4 weeks prior to your test.

    • Bone scans, MUGA, Liver/Spleen, V-Q, and Renal scans do not require any prep.

  • PET SCAN - weight limit 400 lbs - Do not eat or drink anything (except plain water) 4-6 hours prior to your test. Do not chew gum the day of your test. Avoid rigorous activity 24 hours prior to your test. Bring all prior CT or PET scans. If you are diabetic – withhold your insulin 4-6 hours prior to your test. Oral medications may be taken with plain water only. Your sugar must be lower than 200 mg/dl.

  • ULTRASOUND - weight limit 500 lbs - For abdomen, gallbladder, liver, RUQ, and renal artery exams do not eat or drink anything 6-8 hours prior to your test. For pregnancy, pelvis, or bladder exams, you must have a full bladder. Drink 32 oz. water one hour before your appointment time.

  • UPPER GI, ESOPHOGUS, AND SMALL BOWEL SERIES - weight limit 500 lbs - Do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to your test.

  • WIDE BORE MRI/MRA  - weight limit 500 lbs - If you are over 60 years old, diabetic, have blood pressure or kidney issues– BUN & Creatinine (lab work) within the last 30 days is required if you are getting MRI with contrast. AN MRI CANNOT BE PERFORMED IF YOU HAVE A PACEMAKER.

For more information about the radiology department call 502.868.1270

Appointments may be made by calling 833.234.4050